Main Line-Area Beer Gardens to Check Out This Summer

These are among the coolest spots to hang out this season.



Fotolia//Joshua Resnick

To quench the sultry summer heat, pop-up beer gardens have become popular gathering spots for coworkers, friends and families alike. The Main Line and surrounds have an abundance of great venues to check out this season. 

Chestnut Hill Brewing Company Beer Garden

Become one with nature in the naturalistic Chestnut Hill Brewing Company Beer Garden. Trees and flowers encircle the dining area, fairy lights hang through the wooden beams, and natural light shines through the glass roof. Customers can choose from eight small-batch draft beers, three wines and 11 wood-fired Neapolitan pizzas.

8821 Germantown Avenue, Chestnut Hill, (215) 247 0300.

Conshohocken Beer Garden

 

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Conshohocken Beer Garden is operated by Pieri Restaurant Group. There, guests can enjoy a wide array of brews, as well as wine, light bites, live music and outdoor games. The garden is family-friendly, and pets are welcome, as well.

2 Ash St., Conshohocken, (215) 962 5372.

East Falls Beer Garden

Drink tasty craft beer, support food trucks and vendors, listen to local music and have a fun evening with friends and family at the East Falls Beer Garden. This pop-up beer garden is only open every third Thursday from May to October, so make plans now.

4100 Ridge Ave., East Falls.

Independence Beer Garden

The 22,000 square-foot Independence Beer Garden overlooks the Liberty Bell Center and the Independence National Historical Park. Adirondack chairs, large granite boulders, picnic tables and air-conditioned private seating made from repurposed shipping containers seat over 300 guests. Sip on over 40 taps of regional craft beers and nosh on grub like cheesesteaks, fried chicken, mac and cheese, crispy wings, and brisket. A10-foot television, tabletop jenga, ping pong and other outdoor games round out the entertainment options. Recovered timber, aged metals and Tivoli lights embody the garden’s rustic aesthetic.

100 S. Independence Mall W., Philadelphia, (215) 922 7100

Morgan’s Pier

 

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This scenic beer garden seats up to 500 people and is located right outside of downtown Philly on Morgan’s Pier, overlooking the Delaware River. It has a great combination of casual eats by highly acclaimed chefs, craft beer, wine and cocktails, entertainment and. Each summer, this seasonal beer garden invites a different celebrated chef to take over the kitchen with their own version of a chef-hosted backyard barbecue. Just steps from the Ben Franklin Bridge, guests can dine on casual cuisine while soaking up the outdoor scenery.

221 N. Christopher Columbus Blvd., Philadelphia, (215) 279 7134.

PHS Pop Up Garden, South Street

 

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Furnished with romantic and rustic elements and a colorful palette that includes wildflowers, purple and pink annuals and the site’s towering mulberry tree draped in festive lights, the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society Pop Up Garden is not to be missed. Drinks like the Woodermelon—Titos vodka and fresh pressed watermelon juice—and the Bartram—Hendricks gin with fresh cucumber and lime juice—are perfect for summer sipping. An expanded margarita selection, mint juleps, mojitos and sangria round out libations.

1438 South St., Philadelphia, (215) 988 8800.

Suburban Restaurant and Beer Garden

As a newly opened, hyper-local, farm-focused beer garden and restaurant in Exton, the Suburban is a split between a sit-down, modern American restaurant and a casual, picnic-tabled 24-tap beer garden complete with fire pits and a gaming area. Menus showcase  local farms, breweries and distilleries. Check out exclusive tap brews like Levante Kolibri Kolsch and Stickman House Dunkel. The casual ambiance makes it great for lunch or dinner during the week, or for a fun night out on the weekend.

570 Wellington Square, Exton, (610) 458-2337.

Articled updated on 6/15/2018 by Kyleen Considine. 

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